Truth Hurts, and So Does Love (Le Misanthrope)

A modern prose translation of  Molière’s 1666 classic, Le Misanthrope
by David Nicholson ©
[4 women; 4 men; +1 small role that could be doubled by either]
approximate running time: 60-75 minutes

♦   For a free copy of the script or to ask about rights, contact:
davidnicholson.comedies@gmail.com

When Molière wrote Le Misanthrope at the peak of his craft in 1666, many theatre-goers were caught off guard by its difference from his previous comedies.  In the long run, it became his most critically acclaimed play, often compared to Hamlet.  It has also been one of his most frequently produced: it’s been seen over 2400 times at the Comédie- Française alone, including a modern-dress production running until March, 2017.

MISANTHROPE Théâtre national de Strasbourg, France, 2003

Plot and characters:

Le Misanthrope is driven more by character than by plot.  It takes place entirely in the home of Célimène, a beautiful young widow, and opens with Alceste infuriated at his friend Philinte for engaging in such social niceties as paying insincere compliments. We meet bad poet Oronte, wealthy wastrels Clitandre and Acaste, prude Arsinoé, and Célimène’s sensible cousin Éliante.

A Modern Play

Le Misanthrope is Molière’s most modern play, and not only because there are no daughters to be married off. It’s a play about a strongly principled if psychologically troubled man, an independent woman, and the men and women who surround them. It raises questions, but provides few answers. In translating Molière’s French verse into English prose, I deliberately used a contemporary, though generally non-colloquial, level of language to match that modernity. I chose a new title, Truth Hurts and So Does Love, to underline my belief that there’s more to the play than Alceste.

Not a Comedy Like the Others

Modern English-speaking audiences are often as surprised as 17th century Paris theatre-goers to realize the play is not a Molière comedy like Tartuffe or The Miser – changing the title is one way of changing expectations. I’ll leave the rest of the explanation to three theatre reviewers:

  1. The story is one of the least conventionally comic in Molière’s canon

~ Canadian critic Christopher Hoile, 2007

2.     “part of the Misanthrope’s greatness lies, then, in its pushing comedy as far in the direction of tragedy as it can go

~ American critic John Simon, 1975.

3.     “The Misanthrope’s brand of comedy makes solid citizens laugh without the kind of tasteless tired jokes they’ve become accustomed to. It elicits fewer guffaws, to be sure – it’s humour that engages the mind in a more lasting way; it evokes laughter in the soul [“rire dans l’âme.”]

~ translated from Jean Donneau de Visé, in his review of the 1666 opening night of Le Misanthrope.

 To see non-traditional costumes in recent French Molière productions, click HERE.

 


 

Excerpt from ACT II:

 

CÉLIMÈNE

I like people to like me. Does that make me a bad person?  If someone walks in with a big smile, do you want me to beat him off with a stick?

ALCESTE

No – with self-control.  Right now you give your affections away to everyone. Your eyes invite them in, your smile makes them stay, and that captivating laugh has them coming back for more and I . . .  I have no idea why you want them to. Clitandre – is it the artistic fingernails, the different hair colour every week, or the way she preens when she thinks she’s tossed off an exquisite bon mot? You could find better at an upscale zoo.

CÉLIMÈNE

That’s not fair, Alceste . . . not fair to me. You know Clitandre has powerful friends who can make or break my current court case on a whim.

ALCESTE

I’d rather lose the case than court a whim like that.

CÉLIMÈNE

That’s you.  I’d rather win.

ALCESTE

Clitandre’s not even the worst.

CÉLIMÈNE

 You’re jealous of everybody.

ALCESTE

You flirt with everybody.

CÉLIMÈNE

Of course I do.  That’s how little it matters to me. If I didn’t spread my flirting around, you might have cause for concern.

ALCESTE

And what do you offer me that you don’t offer all of them?

CÉLIMÈNE

You have to ask?

ALCESTE

Yes.

CÉLIMÈNE

The happiness of knowing you’re loved.

ALCESTE

I want to believe it. . . .

CÉLIMÈNE

Then why don’t you?

ALCESTE

For all I know, you’ve said the same to dozens.

CÉLIMÈNE

Sweet-talker.

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